Arts & Entertainment

Beauford Delaney

Aug 7th, 2014 | By
Share Button

1901-1979 Beauford Delaney struggled with poverty, mental illness, and obscurity throughout his career as a painter. Since his death, museum retrospectives have reestablished Delaney as one of America’s most vital expressionist painters. A Promising Young Artist Delaney was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, on December 30, 1901. His father, Samuel, was a Methodist minister. His mother,
[continue reading...]



Augusta Savage

Jul 24th, 2014 | By
Share Button

1892-1962 Augusta Savage battled discrimination and financial hardships as an acclaimed sculptor and teacher, and went on to become a key mentor and supporter of numerous black artists who followed in her footsteps. An Independent Woman Savage was born Augusta Christine Fells on February 29, 1892, in Green Cove Springs, Florida. As one of 13
[continue reading...]



Arnold Josiah Ford

Jul 18th, 2014 | By
Share Button

1877-1935 Arnold Josiah Ford was a self-proclaimed Rabbi and the founder of a black synagogue in Harlem. An accomplished musician, he wrote the enduring and inspiring “The Universal Ethiopian Anthem” in tandem with Marcus Garvey’s back-to-Africa movement. Immersed in Music Ford was born in the West Indies, in the city of Bridgetown on the Island
[continue reading...]



Ann Lane Petry

Jul 7th, 2014 | By
Share Button

1908-1997 Ann Lane Petry’s literacy talent exposed readers to issues of oppression and prejudice facing female black Americans. She was a distinguished novelist and short story writer as well as a civic activist. Her novel, The Street, was the first written by an African American that sold over one million copies. Experience Turns to Story
[continue reading...]



Alice Childress

Jun 19th, 2014 | By
Share Button

1916-1994 Alice Childress was a pioneering writer and actress whose award-winning plays and novels were praised for their insightful, compassionate portrayal of realistic characters in difficult situations. With frank language addressing complicated subjects such as racism, sexism, miscegenation, urban poverty, and drug addiction, Childress’ work raised awareness of social issues and was often controversial. Storytelling
[continue reading...]



Addison “Old Add” Jones

Jun 9th, 2014 | By
Share Button

1845?-1926 Addison Jones was a legendary cowboy and cattleman who earned respect for his skills on the vast ranges of the American southwest. His exploits and expertise were celebrated by his peers in a popular campfire ballad. Texas Horseman Jones was likely born sometime in 1845, either in Texas or Mississippi. There are no documents
[continue reading...]



Aaron Douglas

Jun 3rd, 2014 | By
Share Button

1899-1979 Aaron Douglas combined traditional African motifs with cubism and graphic design to create a unique and potent style of illustration during the Harlem Renaissance. He is widely considered to be the father of modern African American art. A Self-Motivated Man Douglas was born in Topeka, Kansas, on May 22, 1899. Both of his parents
[continue reading...]



Bessie Smith

Apr 24th, 2013 | By
Share Button

1894(?) – 1937 – Bessie Smith’s outsize voice and personality made her one of the most popular performers of the early 20th century. Her willingness to fight against any slight, her enormously powerful singing style, and her passion for life informed her music and engaged audiences in that unique expression of the African American experience,
[continue reading...]



Anne Brown

Apr 24th, 2013 | By
Share Button

1912-2009 – Anne Brown navigated a difficult path through the segregated music and theater communities of her time to become one of its outstanding soprano singers. She is best known for her performances as Bess in the classic George Gershwin opera of black southern life, Porgy and Bess. Early Promise Brown was born in 1912
[continue reading...]



Bert Williams

Sep 25th, 2011 | By
Share Button

1874-1922  Bert Williams was one of Broadway’s most successful performers during the first two decades of the 20th century. First with his partner George Walker, then working solo, he transcended the boundaries of the minstrel tradition in which he performed and triumphed as a comedian, dancer, singer, and songwriter. A Caribbean Childhood Williams was born
[continue reading...]



Sitemap